Doctor of Osteopathy

Courses

DOSYS-700: Intro Gross Anatomy

Credits 6.0

The course is designed for incoming medical, veterinary, and masters stuents who wish to start learning Gross Anatomy prior to the start of their program. Course material will be presented through small group discussions and time in the LMU-DCOM anatomy lab. There will be a heavy emphasis on the clinical aspects of anatomy so that the student can equate various physical signs and symptoms with anatomical pathology. Students will begin each day at 8:30 a.m. with a test over the previous day's material. Each test is cumulative to encourage long-term mastery of anatomy. There will also be heavy emphasis on the most efficient ways to study anatomy and other related medical disciplines.

DOSYS-701: Medical Gross Anatomy

Credits 6.5

Medical Gross Anatomy is the study of the body's structure. The course is organized according to the major body regions: back and upper limb; thorax and abdomen; pelvis and lower limb; and head and neck. Laboratory dissections will be utilized throughout the entire course. Supplemental lectures and tutorials will also be given. The student is expected to learn anatomical terminology, three-dimensional and radiological anatomy. Throughout the course students will be challenged to relate the anatomy to solving clinical problems. The latter is an integral part of the anatomy curriculum. Students will be evaluated by a series of four written examinations and four laboratory practical exams.

DOSYS-711: Molecular Fundamentals of Medicine I

Credits 6.5

The Molecular Fundamentals of Medicine I (MFM I) course is designed to provide each student with an integrated understanding of the basic biochemical, molecular, and cellular principles underlying cell structure and function in health and disease. The course integrates the basic science disciplines of molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry and metabolism, pathology, and medical genetics within the context of their clinical applications to basic biomedical sciences. This course will provide a fundamental scaffold of knowledge in basic biological sciences necessary for completion of subsequent medical school curricula, preparation for the COMLEX and USMLE, and success in independent medical practice.

Students will gain an understanding of (1) human molecular biology and genetics; (2) cellular biology and metabolism (3) cellular, molecular, and metabolic abnormalities resulting in pathological conditions and disease; and (4) the molecular basis for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

DOSYS-712: Molecular Fundamentals of Medicine II

Credits 7.0

MFM II focuses on the function of the human immune system and the infectious diseases that afflict humans.  The immunology module explains how our body uses normal microbiota and various components of the immune system for self-regulation, self-healing, and health preservation to protect us from infection and disease.  The microbiology content is delivered in a “bug parade” manner to study the characteristics, disease presentation and pathology caused by individual microorganisms allowing students to determine diagnosis and treatments of infectious diseases.  It is an integrated course introducing the student who may be unfamiliar with microbiology to foundations of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, and mycology.

DOSYS-714: Medical Histology

Credits 4.0

Medical Histology is designed to give students a foundation in the basic structural and functional organization of cells and tissues in the human body. The course focuses on histologic study of basic tissue types and the microscopic anatomy of major organs and organ systems. The understanding of the normal histology presented in this course is critical for the student's ability to: (1) envision the cellular/tissue structures associated with the biochemical and physiological processes explained in other courses, and (2) identify and comprehend the histopathology presented in the second-year systems courses

DOSYS-715: Medical Neuroanatomy

Credits 3.5

This course provides a thorough survey of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems. The basic science components will include embryologic neural development, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology.

DOSYS-716: Medical Physiology

Credits 6.0

This course is a comprehensive study of normal human physiology organized by system, with an emphasis on integration and control, and the osteopathic principles based on the body’s innate capacity for regulation and healing.  Students are also introduced to failures of the regulatory systems, due either to internal or external pathology.  The major class activities are lectures.

DOSYS-717: Medical Basic Pharmacology

Credits 3.5

The course is designed to build a foundation of pharmacologic knowledge. Drug modes of action and physiologic effects that stem from drug actions are introduced systematically by pharmacologic class with emphasis placed upon prototypical and commonly used members from each pharmacologic class.

DOSYS-720: Clinical Neuroscience

Credits 2.5

This course will provide a thorough survey of clinically relevant neurological pathology, epidemiology, and clinical presentation. Treatment strategies for common neurological diseases will be introduced. A concentration will be maintained on those neurological illnesses commonly seen in primary care settings. Collecting basic clinical data, integrating a comprehensive neurological exam, and developing familiarity with terminology common to the practice of neurology will be highlighted.

DOSYS-722: Behavioral Medicine

Credits 2.5

This course will provide a thorough review of clinically relevant topics in psychiatry to better prepare students to evaluate and treat mental illness. A concentration on psychiatric issues seen in primary care settings will be maintained. Behavioral medicine will emphasize epidemiology, diagnosis, medication and psychotherapeutic management, as well as the physician’s role in promoting behavioral change.  The psychiatric diagnostic interview and DSM 5 criteria will be reviewed and applied. This course prepares students for their clinical core rotation in psychiatry as third year students and for their eventual practice of medicine regardless of chosen specialty.

DOSYS-724: Musculoskeletal

Credits 4.0

This course provides the student with an interdisciplinary approach to the primary care focused evaluation and treatment of conditions involving the neuromusculoskeletal system. Foundations of anatomy and biomechanics, physiology, pharmacology, and pathology are included to enhance the understanding of fundamental clinical concepts. Basic science and aspects of clinical neuromusculoskeletal medicine are considered with emphasis upon osteopathic medical practice; familiarity with previous coursework will be assumed and expected. Topics in the areas of orthopedic surgery, sports medicine, radiology, rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, and pain management are included in the course. Methods of examining the neuromusculoskeletal system will be addressed in conjunction with the Essentials of Patient Care when possible.

DOSYS-731: Osteopathic Principles & Practice I

Credits 2.0

This course serves as the foundation of the OPP courses. Diagnosis of somatic dysfunction as well as the application of osteopathic principles are introduced and explored.  This will occur in both the didactic and skills laboratory settings. OPP I will facilitate understanding of scientific mechanisms, diagnosis, integration and application of osteopathic manipulative treatment as part of a comprehensive approach to patient care.

DOSYS-732: Osteopathic Principles & Practices II

Credits 2.0

This course builds on the foundations of manipulative medicine taught in the previous course. Diagnosis of somatic dysfunction and application of osteopathic manipulative treatment will continue to be applied to regions of the body in both a didactic and skills laboratory setting. Students will learn how to apply Osteopathic manipulative techniques to various body regions as we begin to integrate major concepts.

DOSYS-733: Osteopathic Principles & Practices III

Credits 2.0

This course is a continuation of OPP II.  This course will primarily focus on the diagnosis and treatment of somatic dysfunction within the upper and lower extremities.  Students will learn more about the Osteopathic prescription as well as exercise prescription.  Some integration of other systems will be included, as well. 

DOSYS-734: Osteopathic Principles & Practices IV

Credits 2.0

This course is a continuation of OPP III and provides students with a contextual framework for understanding the scientific mechanisms, diagnosis, integration and application of Osteopathic manipulative treatment as part of holistic, comprehensive care for patients with presentations considered in the concurrent systems course(s). This course includes both a didactic and skills component.

DOSYS-741: Essentials of Patient Care I

Credits 2.0

An adequate history and physical examination are fundamental to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.  To that end, this course will teach the student how to perform a medical history and thorough physical examination and accurately record the findings. 

The Essentials of Patient Care (EPC) curriculum consists of four semester-long courses. During EPC I & II, basic history and physical examination skills are taught from an organ systems-based approach. This is accomplished through a multifaceted approach of didactic instruction, hands-on experiential instruction and standardized patient encounters. Additionally, the student is introduced to features of common pathologic conditions associated with these systems in order to bring relevance to early clinical learning. Throughout these two semesters and the following two, emphasis is placed on the patient-centered approach to clinical medicine.

The specific subject matter of this course is as follows:

DOSYS-742: Essentials of Patient Care II

Credits 2.0

An adequate history and physical examination is fundamental to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.  To that end, this course will teach the student how to perform a medical history and thorough physical examination and accurately record the findings. 

The Essentials of Patient Care (EPC) curriculum consists of four semester-long courses. During EPC I & II, basic history and physical examination skills are taught from an organ systems-based approach. This is accomplished through a multifaceted approach of didactic instruction, hands-on experiential instruction and standardized patient encounters. Additionally, the student is introduced to features of common pathologic conditions associated with these systems in order to bring relevance to early clinical learning. Throughout these two semesters and the following two, emphasis is placed on the patient-centered approach to clinical medicine.

The specific subject matter of this course is as follows:

  • Essentials of Patient Care II - Cardiac, abdominal, lymphatic, neurologic and musculoskeletal exams. Incorporating exams head to toe. Case presentations.

DOSYS-743: Essentials of Patient Care III

Credits 3.5

During EPC III and IV, the organ systems are revisited in conjunction with the system being covered in the basic science curriculum. The same teaching modalities employed in the first year are repeated here. During these two semesters, history-taking and physical examination skills are enhanced through the introduction of more advanced technique incorporating the students’ developing recognition of pathologic findings.  The students will learn basic clinical skills in preparation for their clinical rotations.

The specific subject matter of this course is as follows:

DOSYS-744: Essentials of Patient Care IV

Credits 3.0

During EPC III and IV, the organ systems are revisited in conjunction with the system being covered in the basic science curriculum. The same teaching modalities employed in the first year are repeated here. During these two semesters, history-taking and physical examination skills are enhanced through the introduction of more advanced technique incorporating the students’ developing recognition of pathologic findings.  The students will learn basic clinical skills in preparation for their clinical rotations. 

The specific subject matter of this course is as follows:

  • Essentials of Patient Care IV - Advanced interpersonal skills, advanced HEENT, abdominal exams.  Male and female genitourinary exam.

DOSYS-751: Hematology & Lymph

Credits 3.0

This course provides the medical student with an interdisciplinary, integrated approach to the basic science and clinical medicine framework for understanding the fundamentals of the hematopoietic and lymphatic systems. The course will introduce students to biochemical, genetic, pathologic, pharmacologic and immunologic considerations as the basis for an approach to the pathophysiology, clinical evaluation and treatment of hematologic disease. Topics include anemia, hemoglobinopathies, benign white blood cell disorders, primary immunodeficiency disorders, hematopoietic neoplasms, hemostasis disorders, platelet disorders, lymphedema, select infectious disease considerations, along with other specialized topics. Familiarity with previously completed coursework in medical school will be assumed.

DOSYS-755: Renal

Credits 2.5

The purpose of this course is to present relevant clinical information of the pathophysiology and diagnosis and treatment of renal diseases to allow the student to develop an in-depth knowledge of the structures and functions of the human renal system and how they are altered by various specific renal and systemic disease processes. This second-year renal course will build on and augment what the student has already learned in the various first year courses and will develop a more comprehensive understanding of the structure and function of the renal system in health and illness and how it is evaluated. This course will also introduce and reinforce for the student the systemic manifestations of renal disease impacting other organ systems and how pathophysiological processes in other organ systems impact renal function. The course will also provide an introduction to the understanding of the alterations of the pharmacology of various medications as a result of the presence of renal disease.

DOSYS-757: Respiratory

Credits 3.0

The Respiratory Course is designed to instruct students about the pathologic conditions of the Respiratory system. The course is organized by disease types and has the pathophysiology early and integrated throughout the course. The course instructs students    about the diagnostic and therapeutic tools used to evaluate and manage patients with pathology of the respiratory system. Numerous disciplines such as anatomy, microbiology, and pharmacology are used to instruct the students about the evaluation and treatment of the pathology of the respiratory system. Familiarity with previous coursework will be assumed and expected. The greater design of the course is to teach the osteopathic student how to diagnose and treat problems originating from or related to the respiratory system. Methods of examining the respiratory system will be addressed in conjunction with the Essentials of Patient Care when possible.

DOSYS-760: Endocrine

Credits 3.0

This course applies the physiologic principles of hormone production and function to pathologic processes of endocrine disorders. It also explores metabolic dysfunction, including the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and other obesity related conditions. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common adult and selected pediatric  endocrine disorders are covered. Emphasis is placed on understanding the interplay of endocrine regulatory mechanisms as they relate to appropriate treatment of endocrine dysfunction.

DOSYS-762: Reproductive/GU

Credits 4.5

This course will familiarize the student with the female and male reproductive system.  The basic science and clinical information regarding the normal structure and function of the genitourinary system, the pathophysiology of genitourinary system disorders, and the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of these disorders.  Students will receive an introduction to clinical obstetrics and gynecology including basic management principles and introduces principles of clinical diagnosis and management of genitourinary disorders.

DOSYS-764: Gastrointestinal

Credits 3.0

This course tasks the student with applying basic principles of histology, embryology, anatomy, genetics, microbiology, physiology, pharmacology and pathology in order to diagnosis and initially manage gastrointestinal diseases in the adult and pediatric population. Basic concepts of nutrition will also be covered in this system.

DOSYS-768: Integument

Credits 2.0

This course explores the anatomy of the skin, pathologies of the skin and the pharmacology of dermatologic drugs.  Clinical manifestations of skin disorders of various ages are presented in lecture format categorized by classification of lesions and/or diseases.  Treatment explanations, including OMM, are incorporated in the course lectures.

DOSYS-781: Foundations of Modern Hlthcare I

Credits 2.5

This course will introduce students to the structure and function of the healthcare system. The course will also lay the groundwork in establishing the student as a lifelong learner who will uphold the professional and ethical standards of the osteopathic physician.

DOSYS-782: Foundations of Modern Healthcare II

Credits 2.5

This course will introduce students to the structure and function of the healthcare system.   It is comprised of two modules covering specific topics as part of a series using material outlined in the NBOME Blueprint as competencies required for generalist physicians to deliver safe and effective osteopathic medical care.

Module 3: PUBLIC HEALTH/HEALTH POLICY/EPIDEMIOLOGY
This module will introduce students to Public Health, Health Policy, and Epidemiology. In this module students will develop an understanding of a physician’s role in public health and how to use public health in practice.  Students will be taught fundamental concepts of public health, epidemiology, and disaster preparedness that will be used in practice. 

Module 4: VULNERABLE POPULATIONS/CULTURAL COMPETENCY
This module will introduce students to Vulnerable Populations and Cultural Competency. In this module students will develop an understanding of vulnerable populations as well as social inequalities, how these affect health outcomes, and the physician’s roles and responsibilities in these patients’ care. Students will also be introduced to cultural competency in health care and the importance of demonstrating respect, minimizing potential barriers, and integrating culture into the practice of medicine.

DOSYS-783: Foundations of Modern Healthcare III

Credits 2.5

This course will address several components of the healthcare system. It is comprised of two modules covering specific topics, intended to complete the series of material outlined in the NBOME Blueprint as competencies required for generalist physicians to deliver safe and effective osteopathic medical care.

Module 5: BIOSTATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS
This module will introduce students to Biostatistics and Research Methods. In this module students will learn common research designs and biostatistical concepts to help determine clinical significance of research evidence. Additionally, students will develop the skills to evaluate the relevance and validity of research and interpret literature for evidence-based patient care.

Module 6: PERSONAL & PRESCRIPTIVE HEALTH CARE
This module will introduce students to Personal and Prescriptive Health Care. In this module students will identify strategies for personal self-care as well as identify their patient’s capacity for self-care. Students will learn how to provide for their personal care by applying principles of wellness and disease prevention in their personal and professional life. Students will also learn to deal with patients and how to recommend similar strategies of wellness and disease prevention for future patients.